I’ts all about King Ludwig – the anticipated visit to Neuschwanstein Castle

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Our destination for the day was The Hotel Sommer in the Bavarian town of Fussen. Located on the banks of the river Lech, it was the perfect pitstop for our visit to Neuschwanstein Castle. We had a chance to experience a portion of the famous Romantic Road for the drive here from Munich. We meandered […]

Austria – A day in the Old Town of Salzburg

As we drove along the Autobahn rolling hills of green unfolded before us. Glimpses of castles appeared here and there on top of green mountains. Our mood changed for the better. We were full of good humour more than excited as we whizzed by road advertising with comments like “Gute Fahrt!” Austrian for “Have a good trip” but in the English language this was cause for bursting fits of laughter from the back seat. The kids couldn’t help themselves, spending a good portion of our drive asking each other in they had “a good fart”! The joy children get from discussing their bodily functions seizes to amaze me!

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“Have a good trip”

We arrived into Salzburg and were ushered into the beautiful and quaint Hotel Goldener Hirsch. Located across from the Festival Hall and down the street from Mozart’s house. The perfect spot for a quick overnight glimpse of Salzburg old town. We were lucky enough to be given interconnecting rooms with a view over the Getreidegasse. The hotel was most accommodating even though we had booked less than 24 hours ago. We unpacked a few items and settled into our eclectically decorated room  and the rain set in. 

Hotel Goldener Hirsch Our quaintly decorated hotel roomA quick schnitzel to replenish our energy and a family discussion on what was to be the course of our day as the clock was ticking and our day would soon be over.

Top choice was Mozart’s house, and we all decided with the bad weather persisting we would just stick to the Old town and stroll the streets.

Wolfgang Mozart was born in 1756 and just a short walk from our hotel was his home and birthplace. The house was built in the 12th century and the Mozart’s rented the apartment on the third floor. Nowadays the whole building is dedicated to Mozart, giving a great insight not only to Wolfgang but his whole musical family. It was interesting to discover that his sister Maria Anna was also extremely talented and was a child prodigy herself, but as she was a female her talent was not to be encouraged or exploited as Wolfgang’s was. After an extended grand family tour to display the children’s talents Anna Maria was to stay at   home with her mother while Wolfgang further traveled with his father to extend his career.

After a very interesting tour of the austere family home and museum we stepped out onto the Getreidegasse and made our way down the narrow streets dipping into charming old-world shops selling christmas decorations, hand-made leather goods and traditional costumes. The baroque architecture is purely magical and we couldn’t help but linger and admire this decorative and colourful construction that we don’t often get to enjoy in our part of the world.

In the span of an afternoon we managed to fit a visit to Mozart’s monument in the main square, the stunning Salzburg Cathedral, and the Hohensalzburg fortress which rewarded us with stunning views over the town.  Hohensalzburg Fortress, built in 1077 by Archbishop Gebhard is the largest, fully preserved fortress in central Europe. Since 1892 the fortress can be reached by funicular railway. The walk up would be steep indeed if that was the only option.  The fortress looms over the town and is definitely imposing and well worth the visit, but the most interesting sight and the one that has embedded in my mind is the The Petersfriedhof or St. Peter’s Cemetery.

Salzburg Cathedral

Salzburg Cathedral

Salzburg Cathedral

Salzburg Cathedral

Not having done any home work on Salzburg we were lucky enough to stumble upon one of the most beautiful and peaceful cemetaries I have ever seen. it is not often you can marry the word beautiful with cemetery but that is the best word to describe how we felt when we came upon this place. The tombstones are made of intricate iron-scrollwork crosses, impeccably maintained with colourful flowers in bloom. The catacombs loom overhead almost, but the feeling is peaceful and calming walking through the old graves.

It is the oldest cemetery in Salzburg, located at the foot of the Festungsberg with Hohensalzburg Castle. We did not realise at the time but it is one of the most popular attractions of Salzburg. Its origins date back to about 700. The abbey’s cemetery, probably at the site of an even earlier burial place, was first mentioned in an 1139 deed, the oldest tombstone dates to 1288. Closed in 1878, the site decayed until in 1930 the monks of St. Peter’s successfully urged for the admission of new burials.

Petersfriedhof - Salzburg

Petersfriedhof – Salzburg

Petersfriedhof - Salzburg

Petersfriedhof – Salzburg

Petersfriedhof - Salzburg

Petersfriedhof – Salzburg

Our day in Salzburg was a memorable one and our first taste of Austria. Thomas was quietly excited as he sampled a taste of what was to come as he is to return the following year with his school Musical tour.

We casually meandered through the streets sampling a pretzel here and a donut there, Austrian street food was Lucas’ highlight! We managed not to even cross the left bank of Salzach river as time was not on our side. A tiny taste of Austria was enough for us to know we had to come back in the future. The 19th-century Neustadt (New City) and the rolling hills depicted in the musical “The Sound of Music” will have to be explored .Thomas is the lucky one, he’ll be back very soon.

Salzburg

Salzburg

Salzburg

Salzburg

Where are we again?

Where are we again?

Salzburg

Salzburg

Salzburg

Salzburg

Slovenia – A little gem…blink and it’s gone

Slovenia was a sweet little surprise. Words to describe the capital of Ljubljana would be quaint, cute, bohemian and hip. Blink and you would miss this country, only half the size of Switzerland, bordered by four countries; Croatia, Italy, Austria and Hungary.

We arrived late in the afternoon leaving Plitvice National Park as late as we could (we couldn’t tear the kids away). We stayed at the beautiful Antiq Palace Hotel in a serviced apartment which had us in the most vibrant district of this little old city. We’d settled in and were ready to step out into the cobblestone streets when the rain started. This was to be a constant in our travels for the next week.

Heavy rain sets in - Ljubljana, Slovenia

Heavy rain sets in – Ljubljana, Slovenia

Our time in this little country was limited, a mere four days, so with umbrellas in hand we set out to explore the city. The old town is a blend of Baroque, Renaissance, and Art Nouveau buildings, watched over by a medieval castle. A river running alongside creates a serene outlook as you stroll along the stone path bordering the river. The city seemed alive with circus performers, folk bands, singing on street corners and the cafes and restaurants were in abundance.

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The river promenade - Ljubljana

The river promenade – Ljubljana

Street performers in Ljubljana - Slovenia

Street performers in Ljubljana – Slovenia

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The Plečnik Farmers’ market and Triple Bridge were just a few steps away from where we were staying so we spent the couple of days we had here strolling through the streets and ducking in to eat at the market or have a coffee to escape the rain.

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Triple Bridge

Art in the streets

Art in the streets

Butcher's Bridge - Ljubljana's love bridge

Butcher’s Bridge – Ljubljana’s love bridge

Enjoying fresh berries from the market- Ljubljana

Enjoying fresh berries from the market- Ljubljana

Selecting berries at the market - Ljubljana

Selecting berries at the market – Ljubljana

Our next destination in Slovenia was Lake Bled. We set off early from Ljubljana hoping to escape the rain but unfortunately the rain had other ideas. It continued and continued and by the time we reached Lake Bled it was torrential rain. I will not mention where we stayed here as we actually cut our time here short due to the very cold and uninviting host at the small hotel/B&B we had chosen.

We arrived just before midday, parking our car in front of the property and dashing inside from the rain. The first response we get is not a welcome but an abrupt ” You can’t check-in yet, don’t you know check-in is at 3pm” With a raised eyebrow we responded that we were well aware of the time but due to the rain thought it best to park our car and maybe get a recommendation for somewhere to eat. In a gruff voice we were told to walk down the street and we would find something.

We set off in the rain and found a little restaurant just above the lake. We were so taken aback by the attitude of the manager/owner we were a bit hesitant in turning up to check in, we felt like a group of naughty school children terrified to turn up to the school principals office.

Avoiding another meeting with our hotel owner we decided there was no better time than now to set off and explore Lake Bled. Row boats are for hire so we set off on the lake heading toward the island located in the centre of Lake Bled.

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This famous island (Otok) can only be reached by pletna, the flat-bottomed wooden boat hand steered by oarsman for centuries. Thomas was to be our man of the day. Steering with great difficulty, the current was quite strong,he rowed us all the way in misty rain to the island.

We climbed the 98 steps leading up to the church where for years Slovenian grooms carry their brides to assure a long and happy life together.

The 98 Steps leading to the church - Bled

The 98 Steps leading to the church – Bled

Legend has it that if you ring the bell inside the castle’s Church of the Assumption and make a wish, it’ll come true. So of course the kids scrambled and fought to be first to ring the bell.

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The weather was starting to set in and the rain had increased so after some bell ringing we hopped back into our boat and set off back to the shore.

We were lucky enough to stroll back to our accommodation with a slight drizzle and a new person at reception. A warmer friendly tone checked us in and gave us a little tour before we settled into our rooms to change out of our damp clothes and reassess what we were to do for the next 48 hours. We were limited in our walking expeditions in this small resort town and the dark clouds continued to hover the rain progressively got worse as the early evening set in. We couldn’t bear a whole day sitting inside in a small hotel/B&B with three children and an uninviting owner. We felt very uncomfortable shushing the children every few minutes so we wouldn’t get a complaint. Food would help us decide whether to stay put, grin and bear it or forfeit a paid night’s accommodation and move on.

We stumbled upon the restaurant “Okarina” merely by chance and later discovered it was one of the best in the area. A strange mix of Indian, italian and Slovenian game dishes. The kids chose pasta and we were content to try the Wild Boar cutlets and filets of Venison. We walked away full and satisfied and with decision made we trudged through the pouring rain and straight on to the internet to book something for the next day.

We woke the next morning with a determination to get out as fast as we could. The owner refused to give us a refund, not even for one of the rooms, but offered breakfast instead. We accepted, ate our breakfast in eerie silence as no one not even the breakfast staff spoke, heads down, no smile, getting on with their business. We were the only ones in the breakfast room, even the kids felt the vibe whispering whenever they had something to say. Very strange…

We carried our bags downstairs and were out before 09:00am. We’re off to Salzburg, Austria!

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Croatia – Royal Splendours in Split

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Our time in Dubrovnik ended much too soon but we had more to see of this wonderful diverse country. We packed our newly acquired Croatian rent-a-car jamming all the luggage we had accumulated on our trip and headed for Split. The drive from Dubrovnik to Split is one of the best scenic routes of Croatia. […]

A glimpse of Montenegro – Kotor

Our visit to Montenegro was by default. Pre planning a 100 day trip can throw some curve balls at times, but a bit of determination and a lot or research can overcome any hurdles you come across.

We had planned to make our way from Ostuni to Bari and catch a ferry straight to Croatia with our hire car. The plan was to end our trip in Switzerland where we would drop off our car and continue our journey by train. This was not to be as there is a quirky little law in Croatia, that does not allow you to travel on their roads without original car ownership papers. After spending weeks trying to communicate with Hertz car rental clarifying they would give us access to these papers with no conclusive result and thus waiting to book our cabin on the ferry we discover that the ferry was now fully booked.

So it was to be that we boarded Montenegro Lines from Bari, Italy to arrive 9 hours later in Bar, Montenegro. Boarding the ferry was a step back in time to the 50’s, I generally like to think of the positive, I can only say the only positive was it did not sink. The negatives – a rickety rust bucket with spartan facilities. The cabin was old and dirty. The restaurant was closed, and the only edible snack the cafe had was potato crisps, the staff were unhelpful, chain smoking continuously. We pulled out a deck of UNO cards and tried to distract ourselves from our surroundings with a few family games. The hours went by slowly and the only consolation as the sun set and night fell was we could see land in the distance getting closer and closer.  Safety precautions seemed non existent so luckily the ocean was calm and we arrived safely.

Lucas patiently waiting to arrive in Bar, Montenegro

Lucas patiently waiting to arrive in Bar, Montenegro

We arrived late at night and had heard that driving in Montenegro could be hair-raising at times, so I had pre booked a transfer to drive us straight to the town of Kotor. Our driver was a cautious one and we managed to avoid many head on collisions on a few of those sharp winding turns. Montenegrin drivers like their speed!

The country is bordered by Croatia to the west, Bosnia and Herzegovina to the northwest, Kosovo to the east, Serbia to the northeast, and Albania to the south-east. A small country with a very turbulent past. We only caught a glimpse of it’s beauty as our time here was short and sweet. We chose to explore the town of Kotor before our journey into Dubrovnik.

The port of Kotor is surrounded by fortifications built during the Venetian period. It is one of the best preserved medieval old towns in the Adriatic and is a UNESCO world heritage site. After a late breakfast we spent the few hours that we had here exploring the Cathedral of Saint Tryphon built in 1166 and walked the perimeter of the ancient walls getting lost in all the tiny cobble stoned streets.

The boys ventured further and chose to climb the 1350 steps directly above and east of the Old Town, on almost vertical cliffs, up the meandering upper town walls. It looks a little like a short version of the Great Wall. From up above,  there is an excellent view of Kotor and the bay from the St John’s fortress on top.

View of the Clock Tower

View of the Clock Tower

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The narrow streets of Kotor

The fortified walls of Kotor

The fortified walls of Kotor

After a leisurely lunch in the Main Square we picked up our bags from our hotel and took the scenic one and 1/2 hour drive (90kms) over the border to Croatia and the beautiful town of Dubrovnik.

Entrance to the Old Town

Entrance to the Old Town

The Bay of Kotor

The Bay of Kotor

A glimpse of the Bay of Kotor

A glimpse of the Bay of Kotor

On the road again- discovering the Basilicata and Puglia Region

We were sad to say goodbye to the wonderful region that is the Amalfi Coast and the kids were begging to stay just one more day. But we had a schedule and much more to see. After days of having our rental car sitting in an Amalfi garage we braved the winding roads and headed for the Puglia region. Our first stop was the town of Matera. As we drove into the area I actually thought I’d made a mistake as the buildings in the town were unattractive square boxes built in the 70’s with no architectual interest. The GPS was no help at all here, it directed us to a dead end street and reversing in these tiny streets was a major stress. A quick phone call to our accommodation finally had us heading in the right direction. We turned the corner and there it was…

The town of Matera

The town of Matera

Matter is famous for it’s ancient town , the “Sassi di Matera” (meaning “stones of Matera”). The Sassi originate from a prehistoric settlement, and are suspected to be some of the first human settlements in Italy. The Sassi are houses dug into the rock itself,  Many of these “houses” are really only caverns, and the streets in some parts of the Sassi often are located on the rooftops of other houses. The ancient town grew in height on one slope of the ravine created by a river that is now a small stream. The ravine is known locally as “la Gravina”. In the 1950s, Matera was considered the shame of Italy as the infant mortality rate was 50%, the worst in the country. Homes did not have electricity, water or any form of sanitation. The Italian government forced locals to leave their cave like dwellings and relocated them to what is now the modern par of the city. Until the late 1980s the Sassi was considered an area of poverty, with most houses still unlivable. The 90’s bought a new feeling of pride of heritage and some families with government aid were able to renovate their old homes and bring them up to date with modern times. With government grants the current local administration,  became more tourism-oriented, and has promoted the re-generation of the Sassi with the aid of the Italian government and UNESCO. We  based ourselves in the heart of Sassi staying at Locanda Di San Martino. We hired a local guide Antonio who guided us through this well preserved town. The children were kept constantly engaged as we learnt about the original inhabitants from pre historic times to the Benedict Monks who built the cave churches,  through to the poverty stricken streets with raw sewerage and illnesses such as cholera and malaria running rife through the town. Antonio gave us a real insight into this interesting town and the 4 hour walking tour gave us a great insight into the history of this unique town.

A view from the top .. Matter

A view from the top .. Matera

Matera

Matera

Layered cave houses in Matera

Layered cave houses in Matera

Allanah and Thomas deep in thought..

Allanah and Thomas deep in thought..

Matera

Matera

We dedicated 2 nights to Matera on our 100 day trip around Europe. Our plan was a day of touring and a day of respite relaxing in the hotel’s thermal pool. Unfortunately the hotel had failed to advise that children under 16 years of age were not permitted to enter their pool area (one of the main reasons I had chosen the hotel). Spending one more day in a cave room gave us all a bit of claustrophobia, but we had no choice as we had pre paid our room and wouldn’t refund. One full day here is really enough to see all the sights. We filled our extra day repacking and sorting our suitcases , strolling through the winding streets , and consuming an immense amount of gelato (we found the best gelati shop in all of Italy here). We were ready to move on and be on our way to our next destination of Ostuni via Alberobello. Alberobello is in the South Eastern Puglia region. A white washed town distinguishable because of it’s “trulli” homes, conical shaped dry stone huts. This town has been on the tourist route for quite a few years now and it has taken away from some of it’s charm. The souvenir shops are abundant and we found it difficult to find a genuine non touristy restaurant. We managed to have a find quick non-descript meal at a restaurant on the outskirts of the “trulli” district before meandering through the town.There are many theories behind the origin of these interesting homes. One of the more popular theories is that due to high taxation on property the people of Puglia created dry wall constructions so that they could be dismantled when inspectors were in the area. A couple of hours wandering through and stumbling across an industrious local family that opens their home for a small fee to tourists, we were able to glimpse a bit of local life and move on to our destination of Ostuni.

Trulli homes - Alberobello

Trulli homes – Alberobello

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The locals told us to sit on their marital bed for a photo shot.

The locals told us to sit on their marital bed for a photo shot.

View of the Trulli homes in Alberobello

View of the Trulli homes in Alberobello

 

Our drive through the back roads towards Ostuni was very pleasant, olive groves, trulli homes scattered here and there, large expanses of flat farming land. We chose to stay inland rather than coastal this time choosing the Masseria Cervarolo located approximately 6 kms away from the town of Ostuni. This was an A  Puglia style countryside farm lodge. We based ourselves here as we had heard the food was magnificent. We were a few minutes drive from all the sights but a world away from everywhere. Looking back we were dissapointed we didn’t organise to stay here for a week. The setting was so relaxing and we only managed to touch the surface of this region.

Enjoying the pool at Masseria Cervarolo

Enjoying the pool at Masseria Cervarolo

Food was a major part of why we stayed here and we spent the next two nights experience the delicacies of this area. Primarliy Puglian cuisine is based on good honest home grown food, the staff created delicious 6 course meals every evening from fresh produce in the area. We would leave the dining room a few kilos heavier each evening.

We only had the chance to explore a handful of sights in the area. The white washed town of Ostuni was the top of our list. Perched high on top of a hill. The first sight of the town is breathtaking.

Ostuni

Ostuni

We also got the chance to explore the Grotte di Castellana, one of the most important attractions in Puglia. Located at the entrance of the Itria Valley, these limestone caves are Italy’s longest natural subterranean network. We took a guided tour venturing 60 metres deep into an opening that reveals a large cave full of stalactites, stalagmites and other incredible shapes. The tours ventures 3 kms into a winding path with amazing formations and colours. The tour lasted a good one and 1/2 hours, winding through a narrow path, every so often stopping to have the formations explained by the tour guide. In the dim light we walked single file, sometimes stumbling on a very slippery wet path, the unexpectedly we would emerge into a large cave. The kids were truly enthralled but also a little claustrophobic. I think we were all pleased to escape back into the blinding sun when it was over.

At the cave entrance

At the cave entrance

Entering the cave

Entering the cave

Stalactites & Stalagmites in the Grotte di Castellana

Stalactites & Stalagmites in the Grotte di Castellana

Our last afternoon we drove just a few kilometres from our Masseria to visit the Masseria Brancati, they claim to have the oldest olive trees, more than 2000 years old. We where taken an a tour of the underground olive mill and enjoyed a very informative olive oil tasting.

2000 year old olive tree - Masseria Brancati

2000 year old olive tree – Masseria Brancati

This region of Italy has so much to explore and still seems so untouched. The tourists have starting flocking here in the last few years but apart from the hordes of tourists we experienced in Alberobello the other areas we explored there were only a handful of English speaking people we encountered. We plan a future more in depth visit to this amazing region.

Exploring Southern Italy – Positano

After many hugs and kisses, Yiayia and Papou were whisked away by a taxi and we made our way to the Rome Central Termini to pick up our car rental for our drive to Positano. A two and a half hour drive from Rome we skirted Naples and Pompeii until finally reaching the Amalfi Coast. A boring freeway drive until you exit the freeway and hit the famous winding roads hugging the cliffs. The road is narrow barely fitting two cars with a sheer drop into the ocean on one side and a cliff wall on the other. As passengers we were able to enjoy the jaw dropping scenery but poor John had to keep his eyes on the road. A moments glance could have you in a collision or over a cliff in a heartbeat.

Adding to the stress of the drive is the parts of the road that have been washed away over a year ago and are still to be built.Then there are the motor scooters whizzing by overtaking on everly blind corner. Of course there is the local bus that drives 100km per hour to worry about and too the horn if you are too slow.

Once you reach the town of Positano there is the added bonus of pedestrians walking on the side of the narrow road leading you into the town, so narrow you could touch the sides of the building while driving by. The drive to our hotel was definitely an experience and once our car was parked in the hotels garage we didn’t dare think of taking a drive anywhere.

Arriving into Positano - a nail biting experience!

Arriving into Positano – a nail biting experience!

Amalfi Coast

We picked our hotel perfectly staying at The Hotel Marincanto, a boutique 4 star property precariously sitting on the edge of the cliff just like so many other homes and hotels in this area. Enza was the best host anyone could ask for, she was happy to oblige any request and was full of advice and recommendations for sightseeing and food in the area. Gianni made us feel like he was at our beck and call even though he was the only pool guy/waiter serving all the guests at the hotel. He had Lucas’ number the moment we arrived, calling him the “Manager” for the duration of our stay. The views from our little balcony were breathtaking and it was the perfect base for exploring the town. The pool area was magnificent, the kids would jump in the moment we would walk back from a day out and about in the town. We would sit back and enjoy a glass of wine while the sun set over this beautiful region.

Hotel Marincanto Pool - Positano

Hotel Marincanto Pool – Positano

Thomas enjoying the view form our very petite balcony

Thomas enjoying the view form our very petite balcony

The glorious view of Amalfi

The glorious view of Amalfi

Hotel Marincanto Pool

Hotel Marincanto Pool

One of Enza’s recommendations was to experience this breathtaking coast from the water. We set off on our own private boat tour in a beautifully crafted Italian Wooden Motor Boat. We were able to meander along the water along the way dipping into caves and stopping off at beaches only accessible by boat. These beaches were full of locals, no tourists to be seen. I am still to work out how a restaurant is able to function with no access to a road or any signage to advertise it was here, but function it did, selling delicious Italian dishes served to you on the beach! We were later to learn that this was just one of many secluded restaurants along this amazing coastline.

Beautifully crafted boat - Positano

Beautifully crafted boat – Positano

Cruising the Amalfi Coast

Cruising the Amalfi Coast

Cruising the Amalfi Coast

Cruising the Amalfi Coast

Cruising the Amalfi Coast

Cruising the Amalfi Coast

Cruising the Amalfi Coast - Cave visit

Cruising the Amalfi Coast – Cave visit

View of the Amalfi Coastline

View of the Amalfi Coastline

Views from the water

Views from the water

Unfortunately for me the motion sickness set in so after our beach side lunch the Captain was able to drop me off back at the pier in Positano while the rest of the family continued their journey along the coast line meandering to Sorrento.

On our third day of  our stay here the heavens opened and our plans to spend the day like locals hanging out at the local beach were thwarted. Enza came to the rescue suggesting we take a cooking course. In no time at all we were whisked up to the village of Montepertuso high above Positano. A cooking course was booked with the Il Ritrovo Cooking School based in a  family run local restaurant. A shuttle service whisked us into the clouds and up we went to experience an afternoon cooking in a restaurant kitchen. Marylou, the owner’s aunt was our teacher allowing the kids to choose the menu. As we are all foodies, we cooked up a storm making gnocchi, zuchinni flowers, veal saltimboca and orange tiramisu. Salvatore the owner helped the kids with dishing their creations restaurant style. The added bonus was we ate it all!!

Views of Positano from the village of Montepertuso.

Views of Positano from the village of Montepertuso.

Il Ritrovo Cooking School Positano - Marylou teaching the kids to make gnocchi.

Il Ritrovo Cooking School Positano – Marylou teaching the kids to make gnocchi.

Il Ritrovo Cooking School Positano

Il Ritrovo Cooking School Positano

Thomas plating up - Il Ritrovo Cooking School Positano

Thomas plating up – Il Ritrovo Cooking School Positano

Il Ritrovo Cooking School Positano  - The reward

Il Ritrovo Cooking School Positano – The reward

For our final day in Positano we decided to book a walking degustation tour of the town. The tour is run by Christine, an Australian who married a local Positanese. We spent our morning strolling through the small streets of Positano, stopping at eateries to taste local produce and places of interest to learn Positano’s history. It was a great way to end our time here and the children were begging to stay just one more day. We’ve only scratched surface of this wonderful place but I’m sure we’ll be back to taste some more.

Views from every corner as we stroll the small streets

Views from every corner as we stroll the small streets

Degustation Walking tour - Positano

Degustation Walking tour – Positano